People

Paul Anderson, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Director, Data Science
Department of Computer Science
College of Charleston

Anderson is the director of the Data Science B.S. and M.S. Program. He is the leader of the Data Science Research Group, which specializes in developing novel algorithms in the fields of foundational data science, data mining, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. Anderson's expertise includes machine learning, large-scale distributed computing, evolutionary computation and optimization, and biomedical cyberinfrastructure. He has funded multidisciplinary projects in metabolomics, human cognition and fatigue, toxicology, marine biology, cancer informatics, and medical and marine genomics. To date, Anderson has mentored over 30 undergraduate researchers and 7 graduate students. He is the principal investigator for the Omics NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates: in this role, he oversees the overall team-driven research agenda that includes students from Mathematics, Statistics, Computer Science, Data Science, and Biology with PIs from multiple institutions (e.g., NOAA, NIST, and the Medical University of South Carolina). Besides these academic roles, Anderson has active industry partnerships with BoomTown ROI (deep learning and NLP), Ceterus (transfer learning), and Bosch.

Amy Langville, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Mathematics
College of Charleston

Langville holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Operations Research and is an expert in ranking and optimization models. Her postdoctoral work was in text and data mining, with emphasis on ranking methods for the World Wide Web. She has written two widely read research books on rating and ranking and holds a patent for ranking on social networks. Her papers in this field have won awards, including the top-cited award of the Computational Statistics and Data Analysis journal. Langville has served as a consultant, scientific expert, or advisory board member in numerous occasions. She has consulted for the NBA, the U.S. Olympic Committee, Rootmetrics, and several high profile court cases, including the patent infringement case Software Rights Archive vs. Google, Yahoo!, Microsoft, and Ask.com, where she investigated the inner workings of the search engines, including their ranking algorithms. Langville has organized conferences (e.g., 2006 Markov Anniversary Meeting and 2009 Southeastern Ranking and Clustering Workshop), and participated in other scientific institutes, in particular SAMSI, playing roles of increasing responsibility from a participant, session organizer, event leader to the outreach education chair.

Annalisa Calini, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Mathematics
College of Charleston

Calini's research employs techniques from dynamical systems, PDEs, geometry, topology, and complex analysis. Her main interests are in integrable and near-integrable nonlinear wave equations, fluid dynamics, differential geometry, and mathematical physics. Her contributions are to topological and geometric aspects of vortex filament dynamics integrable geometric evolution equations; and models of extreme (or rogue) wave formation in deep water. Calini's recent work has focused on dynamical stability---whether certain solutions (such as bound states and equilibria) are robust under perturbations of initial conditions or of the model itself; and on characterizing and predicting rogue waves, including selection criteria for good rogue wave models, modeling rogue waves in realistic sea states, and a statistical predictor tool based on the spectral transform of the underlying integrable PDE. Calini served as an Applied Mathematics program officer at the NSF (2011--2013). As current co-director of the Mathematical Sciences M.S. Program, she helped design and establish its new statistics concentration, and has contributed to developing an interdisciplinary M.S. Data Science Program. Calini has organized many research meetings, including the SEAMS workshop series (a.k.a. Cha-Cha Days, 2004-2010), over a dozen of special sessions, and the 2016 SIAM Conference on Nonlinear Waves and Coherent Structures in capacity of Activity Group Program Director. She directed or co-directed 11 undergraduate research projects, 4 Master's theses, and 1 Ph.D. thesis.

Garrett Mitchener, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Mathematics
College of Charleston

Mitchener has expertise in dynamical systems theory, probability, and discrete mathematics. His primary research area is in applications of mathematics to biology, learning, and linguistics. In addition, he is an experienced software developer. His current projects include a stochastic model of spontaneous language change in an age-structured population, an optimal stopping problem, and an artificial life simulation for studying the evolution of neural networks and communication. He has supervised undergraduate research projects on models of the human visual system, English syntax, the dynamics of semantics, and adapting Scrabble for non-English languages. He is also a co-director of the annual Math Meet, a day-long mathematics contest attracting around 500 high school students to the College of Charleston campus to compete in written tests and quiz-bowl style events.

Timothy Chartier, Ph.D.

Professor
Mathematics and Computer Science Department
Davidson College

Chartier specializes in sports analytics. He frequently works on data analytics projects with groups such as the NBA, NFL, ESPN's Sport Science program, NASCAR teams, and fantasy sports sites. He also serves as Chief Academic Officer for the predictive software company Tresata. He, along with a team of over 60 student researchers, supply analytics to Davidson College sports teams. Dr. Chartier is a recipient of a national teaching award from the Mathematical Association of America and his research was recognized with an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship. He authored the book "When Life is Linear: From Computer Graphics to Bracketology” and "Math Bytes: Google Bombs, Chocolate-Covered Pi, and Other Cool Bits in Computing”. He also taught a 24-lecture series entitled "Big Data: How Data Analytics Is Transforming the World for Teaching Company”. Dr. Chartier serves on the Editorial Board for Math Horizons. He was the first chair of the Advisory Council for the National Museum of Mathematics. He has also worked with Google and Pixar on their K-12 educational initiatives. Dr. Chartier has served as a resource for a variety of media inquiries, including appearances with Bloomberg TV, NPR, the CBS Evening News, USA Today, and The New York Times.

Yoichi Izunaga, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
University of Tsukuba (Tokyo Campus)

Izunaga is an expert in mathematical optimization and operations research.